Supported by NED Foundation

  • LIVE VIRTUAL Restorative Justice – Facilitating Dialogue | CTRI Canada

    Selected Extract: 

    'A restorative justice approach works to repair harm and strengthen communities where wrong has occurred. It seeks to meet the needs of those harmed, while also considering the causes of the wrongful behavior in order to promote accountability and growth for the one who caused harm. This highly experiential workshop utilizes a trauma-informed approach, and provides frameworks for identifying and responding to the needs of all those who were impacted by the wrong.

  • Restorative

    Selected Extract: 

    'Restorative practice is a strategy that seeks to repair relationships that have been damaged, including those damaged through bullying. It does this by bringing about a sense of remorse and restorative action on the part of the person who has bullied someone and forgiveness by the person who has been bullied. Once identified, the students who have been bullying meet with the Restorative practitioner and other students who have been selected because they are expected to be supportive of the person who has been bullied (who is not present).

  • Restorative practices | Australian Mediation Association

    Selected Extract: 

    'Victims get the opportunity to have their say in a safe forum, both about how they were affected and what they want to see happen to repair the harm. Family and other supporters also get to talk about what has happened to them as a result of the incident, and then take part in deciding in what needs to be done. The offender is confronted, often for the first time, with how their behaviour has affected others, including their own families. They take responsibility for their behaviour and are not allowed to walk away from the community of people they have hurt.

  • Cancel Culture vs Rape Culture, and the Case for Repairing Harm

    Selected Extract: 

    'A victim might not want a jail term for an offender. She might desire an outcome that could range from apology to financial restitution, coupled with a sentence for the offender that could be community service or therapy. This does not mean victims must forgive those who have harmed them. It’s also not about prioritising offenders’ futures, in the way that courts have historically exonerated men.