Supported by NED Foundation

  • Evaluating New Zealand’s restorative promise: the impact of legislative design on the practice of restorative justice

    Selected Extract: 

    'ABSTRACT Restorative justice is regarded in modern criminal justice systems as one approach to address inadequacies in the conventional justice model. New Zealand has become a leader in implementing legislatively mandated restorative procedures. This reputation is due in part to a handful of supportive statutes: the Sentencing Act 2002, the Victims’ Rights Act 2002, the Parole Act 2002, the Corrections Act 2004 and subsequent amendments to those acts.

  • Father Gregory Boyle says compassion is the best approach to gangs

    Selected Extract: 

    'He tries to remind society that we are called to "stand in awe of what these people have to carry, instead of judgment in how they carry it". His world view grates against the ongoing commentary about gangs, whether in the US, New Zealand, or pretty much anywhere. Just in the past month, Simon Bridges blamed Labour for being soft on crime, which he claimed led to an increase in gangs who "peddle misery". He later walked back his comments by saying he believed in "redemption", but there still needed to be a crackdown on criminals. '

  • RAD: Restorative Justice and Practices - Global Perspectives : Fleming College

    Selected Extract: 

    'Discover the historical and theoretical development of restorative justice in several countries including Canada, Australia and New Zealand. In addition, in this course you will critically assess contemporary research on restorative justice to determine the extent to which restorative justice processes have a positive impact on participants and how to improve current practices.'

  • Restorative Justice - Catholic Outlook

    Selected Extract: 

    'In a Catholic response to crime, the first step is to see as persons both those who commit the crime and those hurt by it, each with a unique value, and to see the crime as a sign of broken relationships leading to a lack of due respect and a lack of connection to society on the part of the perpetrator. The challenge is to encourage the persons who offend to grow in respect so that they accept their accountability to the people offended and to representatives of the community. This is called restorative justice.

  • www.anzela.edu.au

    Selected Extract: 

    'Keeping Them Connected: Restorative Justice in Schools in Australia and New Zealand – what progress? The traditional response of schools to school discipline is based on the retributive approach which has long characterised the criminal justice system. Research now indicates that this approach generally fails to satisfy the victim, the offender and the community. In the context of criminal offending, attention is increasingly being paid to the application of restorative practices.

  • Pauline Hanson has a youth crime plan. There’s just one problem

    Selected Extract: 

    'Sally Varnham, professor of law at the University of Technology Sydney, said there was emerging evidence that a “restorative justice” approach to youth crime was more effective than the “short, sharp shock” approach proposed by Senator Hanson. “Schools are introducing restorative practice also in Australia and New Zealand in an attempt to keep young people in schools, as there is such strong evidence of the ‘schoolyard (instead of) jail yard track’,” Dr Varnham said.'