Supported by NED Foundation

  • The real meaning of discipline

    Selected Extract: 

    'Schools need to be transformed into communities where everyone belongs, where differences are accepted and membership is unconditional. Schools can and should be places that all students can love. Making this change will require educators to think differently about student behavior and reflect on how they respond to it.

  • Discussion with Annemieke Wolthuis

    Selected Extract: 

    'Annemieke is the Vice-Chair of the European Forum for Restorative Justice (EFRJ), mediator and a children’s rights consultant, working for Restorative Justice Netherlands and living in Utrecht with her family. We were interested to ask her about what difficulties the current crisis means for children and young people, as they are often even in a more vulnerable situation in times of social change. In our discussion Annemieke also reflected on what the EFRJ can during the crisis, and we asked her as well about the situation in the Netherlands.

  • Classroom 'Circle Time' Moves Online During Coronavirus Pandemic

    Selected Extract: 

    'Personal, Daily Connections As soon as schools closed, Lurenz-Seguin knew she needed to maintain a personal, daily connection with her students. Many of them are still developing language skills, and she wanted to continue building on the progress they had made in class, she said. In Lurenz-Seguin's virtual circle times, she breaks the block of time into chunks. First, she and the students sing a good morning song, then they move onto the days of the week, then practicing vocabulary and having conversations.'

  • Relief for Sunshine Coast residents allowed to return home following bushfire threat

    Selected Extract: 

    'Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll has told the Seven Network at least eight blazes have been traced back to deliberate lighting by children, with offenders arrested, cautioned or "dealt with under our restorative justice processes."'

  • www.qld.gov.au

    Selected Extract: 

    'Restorative justice is an internationally recognised evidence-based response to criminal behaviour. It views a criminal offence as more than an act of breaking the law and examines the impact on society; the harm caused to the victim, family relationships and the community. We are using restorative justice processes to reduce an overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the justice system by diverting children from court to restorative justice conferences.'

  • OJJDP News @ a Glance - May/June 2019

    Selected Extract: 

    'Restorative justice encompasses a wide range of practices and approaches that focus on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with victims and the community at large. These practices have expanded rapidly and now involve multiple models and approaches, including victim-offender conferences; group conferences, which can include family members, friends, and others in the community; and “peacemaking circles,” a process adapted from ancient tribal conflict-resolution rituals.