Supported by NED Foundation

  • Newcastle as a restorative city

    Selected Extract: 

    This initiative aims to transform Newcastle into a restorative city by building social cohesion and healthy communities.

    Newcastle has pockets of disadvantage in relation to unemployment, income, education, housing, child welfare, and criminal justice.

  • Restorative justice conferencing

    Selected Extract: 

    'Restorative justice is an internationally recognised evidence-based response to criminal behaviour. It views a criminal offence as more than an act of breaking the law and examines: the impact on society the harm caused to the victim, family relationships and the community. The restorative justice process requires effort and participation from the child, which differs from traditional justice responses.'

  • My Child Was a Victim of Restorative Justice. But It Doesn't Have to Be This Way.

    Selected Extract: 

    'We ultimately pulled our son from the district. I am a career educator and strong believer in public education. But I am a mom first. The school’s handling of my son’s torment and subsequently proposed solutions were unacceptable and there was not a chance I would keep my son in a school where their only way of protecting him was to change his schedule and dismiss him early. The “restorative” circle he sat in, bravely facing his aggressors, only made him a target for more torment. Now, don’t get me wrong.

  • Newcastle as a Restorative City Initiative

    Selected Extract: 

    'The Newcastle as a Restorative City Initiative aims to transform Newcastle into a restorative city by building social cohesion and healthy communities. This has been fostered by an increased need for social, cultural and economic renewal in Newcastle to address the pockets of disadvantage in relation to unemployment, income, education, housing, child welfare, and criminal justice.

  • OJJDP News @ a Glance - May/June 2019

    Selected Extract: 

    'Restorative justice encompasses a wide range of practices and approaches that focus on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with victims and the community at large. These practices have expanded rapidly and now involve multiple models and approaches, including victim-offender conferences; group conferences, which can include family members, friends, and others in the community; and “peacemaking circles,” a process adapted from ancient tribal conflict-resolution rituals.