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    This training handbook aims to provide insights into the topic of violent radicalisation and the usage of restorative dialogue for its’ prevention and reduction/combat. As previously mentioned, it is part of the ERASMUS+ project RDaVR – Restorative Dialogue against Violent Radicalisation and it was written by the partner organisations involved: RJ4All, BOSEV, I&F, CPIP, Sinergia, Tuzla, and Casa Eslava.

    The purpose of the handbook is to provide more in-depth information about restorative justice for professionals working with o enders, ex-o enders, or people at risk of violent radicalisation and group violence. Restorative justice is not in opposition to current criminal justice practices, but complementary.

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    An instructional manual on restorative justice in schools from world-leading experts; this 'how to' guide offers guidance on the issues of carrying out restorative practices, including coping with day-to-day problems, and offers worksheets for practical daily use.

    Beginning with challenges to orthodox thinking about behaviour change, it goes on to describe a multitude of approaches to respond to minor incidents in school settings, then takes a close look at using restorative approaches to bullying, before it finally focuses on the formal end of the continuum (including conference preparation and facilitation). This book is reflective of the evolution of processes and responses from the most serious of incidents through to minor everyday issues, making this an essential resource for all school staff.

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    WHAT ARE LISTENING CIRCLES?

    Listening Circles provide time, a safe space and an authentic audience where the voices of those who have been impacted by the sexual abuse crisis within the Catholic Church.

    Listening Circles are restorative in nature and they provide time, space and an authentic audience for the voice of those who have been impacted in some way by this crisis.

    The created space must be both sacred and safe. The voice of the process says, ‘we all care’ and ‘you matter’. The process has agreements that guide interactions. The agreements are transparent and help establish and maintain respect and equity.

    Listening Circles are NOT occasions for discussion or debate or decision making. Within this domain, there are no attempts to solve problems or to level blame.

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    In my conversations with other educators, there is usually confusion around the definition of restorative practices due to the common emphasis placed on restorative justice, which focuses on repairing relationships when harm has occurred as an alternative to punitive approaches to discipline. In contrast, restorative practices focus on not only repairing, but also building and strengthening relationships and social connections within communities. The mainstream conception of restorative justice is credited to Howard Zehr and is thought to have originated within the criminal justice system in the 1970s. However, a 2017 report from the Zehr Institute for Restorative Justice, notes the growing demand from the field that practitioners acknowledge many of the values and practices of restorative justice come directly from Indigenous communities in North America and across the globe.

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    Much more than a response to harm, restorative justice nurtures relational, interconnected school cultures. The wisdom embedded within its principles and practices is being welcomed at a time when exclusionary discipline and zero tolerance policies are recognized as perpetuating student apathy, disproportionality, and the school-to-prison pipeline.

    Relying on the wisdom of early proponents of restorative justice, the daily experiences of educators, and the authors’ extensive experience as classroom teachers and researchers, this Little Book guides the growth of restorative justice in education (RJE) into the future.

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    'Schools need to be transformed into communities where everyone belongs, where differences are accepted and membership is unconditional. Schools can and should be places that all students can love. Making this change will require educators to think differently about student behavior and reflect on how they respond to it.

    Real discipline should be more than deciding what consequences to use with students; it should always be about learning. So when students break the rules or have trouble, educators need to ask, "How can we help them learn what they need to learn, and how can we meet their needs?" The answers to those questions should shape both our discipline practices and the type of school that we provide for our children.'

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    'Restorative practices are rooted in restorative justice. They emphasize repairing the harm done to people and relationships, rather than punishing people.

    By building more supportive learning environments and focusing on social-emotional learning, restorative practices can:

    reduce social barriers to learning, engage more students, create a context for understanding and valuing diversity, nurture a sense of belonging, promote positive mental health'

    A set of strategies that can transform learning environments and help school staff respond more effectively to unacceptable behaviour.

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    Discovering Restorative’s True Potential - Free Webinar Terry O'Connell, Kerrie Sellen and Paulo Moratelli are offering a FREE webinar to talk about how Restorative Practice can be used to significantly improve your practice. We are experienced restorative practitioners who over many years have learned how to use ‘restorative’ as a relational foundation for everything we do, both in our personal and professional lives. Simply, we want to challenge you to reflect on your own practice, identify what Works, then discover the difference restorative practice can make in strengthening your practice by making it more explicit, intentional, consistent and impactful. We will provide an insight into how our explicit restorative practice framework has provided a clear practice rationale that emphasises the importance of understanding the ‘why’ of what we do. We will also share how our values, beliefs and working assumptions influence and shape our practice. We will draw on case studies to show how explicit restorative practice has the potential to build relational capacity in almost an situation, example such as: one-on-one interactions, dealing with complex and traumatic matters through to developing a more humane organisational culture in schools and workplaces. Terry O’Connell is a restorative pioneer, best known as the ‘cop from Wagga Wagga’ who in 1991 developed the restorative conference script used by the IIRP. Over the past thirty years his work has continued to evolve and has had considerable influence in a variety of setting including policing, schools, corrections, workplaces and community agencies across the world. Kerrie Sellen is an experienced youth worker whose innovative restorative work led to the establishment of arguably the world’s first fully restorative organisation Re-Engage Youth Services in 2009. This award-winning organisation was known for how it integrated restorative practice in everything with leadership and staff but importantly with young people and their families. Kerrie now runs Restorative Journeys and provides mentor, coaching and training support for a wide and diverse range of organisations and practitioners throughout Australia. Paulo Moratelli is a brazilian Psychologist, Executive Director of Coonozco / Diálogos Transformativos, lecturer and independent instructor of Restorative Justice, Transformative Dialogues and Transformative Circles (a method he developed), and Peacemaking Circles. He is Delegate for Brazil of the Sociedad Científica de Justicia Restaurativa (Spain), and Member of the Global Advisory Council of Restorative Justice International (USA).

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    'Restorative practices, and relationship management more broadly, can be part of broader exercise of consciously redesigning for a more conflict resilient workplace. Again, this approach is based on foundational principles of: causing no further harm, working with those involved, and seeking to set relations right. A “restorative” approach asks a different set of questions.'

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    'IIRP Continuing Education brings together leading research, theory and practice. We offer a growing array of online professional development events to teach you concepts and soft skills needed to stand out in your professional environment. Our experienced instructors are skilled practitioners, adept at helping you learn and implement restorative practices in your setting. For more than 10 years, the IIRP Graduate School has pioneered master's-level online learning in the social science of relationships and community. Our faculty bring their wealth of knowledge to support the design and structure of our online offerings.'

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    'It seems like a herculean task to ask every single person in a school to contribute to your schoolwide expectations. However, the Restorative Practice of the community circle is an excellent way to intentionally work together to establish community values and behavioral expectations. Restorative Practices ideals emphasize that “rules” established by authority figures are less likely to create the positive community we are seeking. Instead, our standards for how we interact should be co-created (WITH) so everyone feels like they contributed. When we adults show respect for students' needs and listen to their voice, we are modeling to them how to respect the needs of others. As students help in creating schoolwide and classroom expectations, they get to experience mutual respect and shared power.'

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    'It seems like a herculean task to ask every single person in a school to contribute to your schoolwide expectations. However, the Restorative Practice of the community circle is an excellent way to intentionally work together to establish community values and behavioral expectations. Restorative Practices ideals emphasize that “rules” established by authority figures are less likely to create the positive community we are seeking. Instead, our standards for how we interact should be co-created (WITH) so everyone feels like they contributed. When we adults show respect for students' needs and listen to their voice, we are modeling to them how to respect the needs of others. As students help in creating schoolwide and classroom expectations, they get to experience mutual respect and shared power.'

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    'A new policing paradigm is called for as an integral part of policing, and not just an interjection of restorative justice processes into current policing practice. Restorative practices should underpin all policing and be guided by restorative justice values of respect, dialogue and relationships, and not focused on crime, but broadly on harmful wrongdoing and conflict and support for victims and affected communities. Restorative policing is a relational paradigm of policing that focuses on creating safer, more connected communities through restorative justice practices underpinned by restorative principles of safety, accountability, sustainability, relationship building and constructive engagement.'

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    'A new policing paradigm is called for as an integral part of policing, and not just an interjection of restorative justice processes into current policing practice. Restorative practices should underpin all policing and be guided by restorative justice values of respect, dialogue and relationships, and not focused on crime, but broadly on harmful wrongdoing and conflict and support for victims and affected communities. Restorative policing is a relational paradigm of policing that focuses on creating safer, more connected communities through restorative justice practices underpinned by restorative principles of safety, accountability, sustainability, relationship building and constructive engagement.'

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    'Around this time, I was attending a principals’ conference and heard Adam Voigt (Real Schools) speak about this very issue. Adam’s philosophy is very much built around establishing and maintaining effective relationships in the school setting, not only student to student, but also student to teacher. A key part of this is encouraging students to actually understand the damage they may have done to their relationships with others, due to incorrect behaviour and to then help them through the process of being better at ‘getting it right’ i.e. restoring the relationship. This resonated strongly with me and shortly afterwards Yarra Hills Secondary College embarked on a partnership with Real Schools to start the process of creating a restorative environment and embedding it in school practices'