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    An instructional manual on restorative justice in schools from world-leading experts; this 'how to' guide offers guidance on the issues of carrying out restorative practices, including coping with day-to-day problems, and offers worksheets for practical daily use.

    Beginning with challenges to orthodox thinking about behaviour change, it goes on to describe a multitude of approaches to respond to minor incidents in school settings, then takes a close look at using restorative approaches to bullying, before it finally focuses on the formal end of the continuum (including conference preparation and facilitation). This book is reflective of the evolution of processes and responses from the most serious of incidents through to minor everyday issues, making this an essential resource for all school staff.

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    'Fleming is also sceptical of the benefits of legislative change to address the issue. But instead of an app she believes Australia should move towards a restorative justice model to address sexual assault matters.

    Restorative justice is not a new concept but it gained fresh relevance during the MeToo movement in the US. It can encompass a variety of survivor-led actions to repair the harm caused by a sexual assault, including sometimes bringing the accuser and the accused together “to discuss what happened, what needs to happen, and find a way of healing or reparations”.'

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    'From the streets of Minneapolis, the aboriginal lands of Australia, and the killing fields of Cambodia come the powerful stories of three people who had the courage to step out of the haunting, tragic darkness of the past, risking everything to reach the light of their own compassion. RISKING LIGHT is a thought-provoking documentary that explores resilience, and the painful process of moving from grief to compassion and forgiveness. Through the unforgettable stories of Mary Johnson, who grieves a murdered son; Debra Hocking, a victim of government-sanctioned genocide; and Kilong Ung, who survived the terror of the Khmer Rouge, RISKING LIGHT challenges us to examine our own beliefs about forgiveness and ask “What would the world look like if we could learn to forgive one another?”'

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    'From the streets of Minneapolis, the aboriginal lands of Australia, and the killing fields of Cambodia come the powerful stories of three people who had the courage to step out of the haunting, tragic darkness of the past, risking everything to reach the light of their own compassion. RISKING LIGHT is a thought-provoking documentary that explores resilience, and the painful process of moving from grief to compassion and forgiveness. Through the unforgettable stories of Mary Johnson, who grieves a murdered son; Debra Hocking, a victim of government-sanctioned genocide; and Kilong Ung, who survived the terror of the Khmer Rouge, RISKING LIGHT challenges us to examine our own beliefs about forgiveness and ask “What would the world look like if we could learn to forgive one another?”'

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    'Around this time, I was attending a principals’ conference and heard Adam Voigt (Real Schools) speak about this very issue. Adam’s philosophy is very much built around establishing and maintaining effective relationships in the school setting, not only student to student, but also student to teacher. A key part of this is encouraging students to actually understand the damage they may have done to their relationships with others, due to incorrect behaviour and to then help them through the process of being better at ‘getting it right’ i.e. restoring the relationship. This resonated strongly with me and shortly afterwards Yarra Hills Secondary College embarked on a partnership with Real Schools to start the process of creating a restorative environment and embedding it in school practices'

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    'Around this time, I was attending a principals’ conference and heard Adam Voigt (Real Schools) speak about this very issue. Adam’s philosophy is very much built around establishing and maintaining effective relationships in the school setting, not only student to student, but also student to teacher. A key part of this is encouraging students to actually understand the damage they may have done to their relationships with others, due to incorrect behaviour and to then help them through the process of being better at ‘getting it right’ i.e. restoring the relationship. This resonated strongly with me and shortly afterwards Yarra Hills Secondary College embarked on a partnership with Real Schools to start the process of creating a restorative environment and embedding it in school practices'

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    'Restorative justice programs in Australia : a report to the Criminology Research Council - Heather Strang March 2001 Abstract This report provides an overview of restorative justice programs in Australia. While a wide range of programs may be broadly labeled 'restorative', the report mainly focuses on programs involving meetings of victims, offenders and communities to discuss and resolve an offence. On a state by state basis, programs are described in terms of their characteristics, implementation and administration, evaluation and relevant publications. While restorative justice programs are generally seen as being most suitable for juvenile offenders, the report also describes the use of conferencing programs for adult offenders in Queensland, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory. Other topics covered include the use of restorative programs in the school setting and in the care and protection setting; problems and some solutions in devising and implementing programs, including the question of restorative justice programs in Indigenous communities and ethnic communities; and the effective extension of restorative justice programs.'

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    'Restorative Practices / Community Conferencing Pilot 2002 This report provides an evaluation of a nine month Pilot of Restorative Practices / Community Conferencing in Victorian schools during 2002. The Pilot was designed to support and evaluate the application of restorative practices as a strategy in the management of incidents and in order to reduce the number young people at risk of being alienated from mainstream education. This Pilot provides sufficient evidence to suggest that restorative practices / community conferencing can be a highly effective way to manage incidents in Victorian schools. The experience of the staff, students and parents from 23 government and Catholic schools and from 16 regional support staff involved affirmed results of other reviews in Australia and internationally.'

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    This page is an attempt to create a sampling of resources in the Restorative Practices field that are currently visible on the Internet and in Social Media that might in some way indicate, and eventually perhaps define, the conceptual and praxis territory of this field. The sample resources are collected together here, and in a well-specified process migrated into a database for the particular purpose of building up coverage of the field. The database is growing, and exists on a Vultr Server in Sydney Australia, and also captured regularly onto Amazon S3. There are currently (at 2 November 2019, 10am AEST) 362 records in the database, corresponding to 362 data items that can over time be presented in various ways. The current presentation is visible at:

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    'Discover the historical and theoretical development of restorative justice in several countries including Canada, Australia and New Zealand. In addition, in this course you will critically assess contemporary research on restorative justice to determine the extent to which restorative justice processes have a positive impact on participants and how to improve current practices.'

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    'This year’s IJRJ lecture will be on “The Indecent Demands of Accountability for Young People in Restorative Justice” by Dr William R. Wood (School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University, Australia). It will be introduced by EFRJ founder Ivo Aertsen (editor-in chief) and chaired by Estelle Zinsstag (managing editor).'

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    'Keeping Them Connected: Restorative Justice in Schools in Australia and New Zealand – what progress? The traditional response of schools to school discipline is based on the retributive approach which has long characterised the criminal justice system. Research now indicates that this approach generally fails to satisfy the victim, the offender and the community. In the context of criminal offending, attention is increasingly being paid to the application of restorative practices. In New Zealand the restorative justice model has been operating since 1989 for youth offending and is now being implemented in the context of adult offending also. The Australian states and territories are following to varying degrees. Restorative practices move the focus from punishing the offender to requiring them to take responsibility for their actions. Because of this focus they are not seen as a ‘soft option’, and there are many indications of their success. Many schools are now applying this model to school discipline. A variety of different practices are being employed to keep young people in school and connected with the education process, while still not compromising school safety. This article explores the incorporation of restorative practices as alternative and proactive responses to behavioural problems within some Australian and New Zealand schools. The focus here is on particular restorative practices with the acknowledgement that there is a much wider picture which involves changes in school cultures to embrace, in a practical manner, principles of citizenship and democracy. This concept is the subject of significant research which is discussed by the author in a previous article.